The Monarch’s Way: Sussex

The Monarch’s Way is a route that Charles II took when escaping from Oliver Cromwell after the Battle of Worcester in 1651. liquid glitter case iphone 6 Part of this route is along the South Downs. iphone 8 plus case card holder For more information visit – http://www.monarchsway.50megs.com/ A group of us decided to spend one night camping and two days walking part of the Monarch’s Way, fortnite iphone 8 case starting from Amberley and ending in Shoreham-by-Sea. iphone 8 sonix case We lo-impact camped on the South Downs using Hammocks, Tarps and Bivvi Bags. Photographs taken with a Holga, iphone 8 plus case tech 21 shot on out of date Velvia film, rugged case iphone 7 X processed.

Photos of Saltdean coast

I finally got myself out of Brighton for a while at the Easter weekend. Being a confirmed pedestrian I don’t often get the chance to visit the Sussex countryside, and Brighton can seem a very small place sometimes – gives me cabin fever.

So, the wife and I took the number 12a bus to Rottingdean, just out of (but officially part of) Brighton. After a disappointing pub lunch at the Badgers Watch we walked along the cliff tops to Saltdean, were we did a U turn and walked back along the seafront back to Rottingdean and the bus stop.

I took my Holga and a couple of rolls of film, here are the best shots:

Saltdean cliff tops

Saltdean cliff tops

Saltdean sea walk

Saltdean

Rottingdean bus stop

Saltdean cliffs (film slipped with this one)

Saltdean cliffs

Saltdean cliffs

op

Photographer’s stamp

Just before Christmas I designed a graphic for photographer Nhung Dang. She had a clear idea what she wanted, a homage to the Carte De Visit, popular in the 1800’s. In particular Nhung wanted me to produce a graphic that mimicked the photographers stamp usually placed on the back of the Carte De Visit. These stamps are a wonderful example of typographic execution in the decades before Modernism finally took hold of popular culture and revolutionized typographic design.

Here is the graphic I produced:

Design for Nhung Dang

Here are some of the original designs I ripped off used as reference.

Photographers details from the 1800's

Photographers details from the 1800's

Photographers details from the 1800's

op

To Be Adored – fashion collection by Binbin McNiven

I recently helped out with designing a logotype for tba or To Be Adored. tba is the collection of Binbin McNiven, graduate of Brighton university and ex assistant to Alexander McQueen. I supplied a few alternatives and the chosen logotype used Carousel which middle class types can recognise as the face used for the Observer Magazine’s titles and headings. Carousel also has amazing numerals which I have used on another project that I am sure will appear on this site soon.

tba_logo

I really like Binbin’s collection – the sixties shapes & silhouettes are beautiful and her colour choices are right up my street, navy blues and lots of warm autumnal colours – mustard yellow makes an appearance, and I love a bit of mustard yellow.

Here are a couple of lifestyle shots from tba’s spring/summer collection, shot at Brighton’s hotel Pelirocco. Check out the links below for more info on the new tba collection.

tba01

tba

tba03

tba

tba

tba

tba

tba

http://www.ilovetba.co.uk/

Also stocked at Urban Outfitters

op

Degree Show: University of Brighton

BA(Hons) Graphic Design & BA(Hons) Illustration: University of Brighton.

Well, I am a little late posting this, last chance to see it is the 11th June. The standard of work is pleasingly high and I expect the degree show website will be live for a little longer.  Good luck to the graduates.

Here are a couple of images that I thought were particularly interesting.

Chris Smith: BA(Hons) Illustration

Chris Smith: BA(Hons) Illustration

Saly Troughton: BA(Hons) Graphic Design

Saly Troughton: BA(Hons) Graphic Design

Joe Wood: BA(Hons) Illustration

Joe Wood: BA(Hons) Illustration

Lizzie Wylson: BA(Hons) Graphic Design

Lizzie Wylson: BA(Hons) Graphic Design

op

The Glenkiln Sculptures

In between 1951 and 1976 landowner ¬†William Keswick dotted several sculptures around the glen of Glenkiln. There are a couple of small abstract numbers on the main road, an impressive John the Baptist by Auguste Rodin (a version of which is in the Musee d’Orsay, Paris), overlooking the Glen, five by Henry Moore and a Jacob Epstien. (Visitation). One of the Henry Moore’s (Two Pieces Standing) is a fiber glass replica, the original being only a loan and after 14 years was called back by the estate of the artist.

The Glenkiln Cross by Moore is at the top of a raggy steep sheep shit strewn field and gives an amazing view across the Glen, the cross is interesting in itself as from afar it looks like a christian cross but once you have made your way up the field, close up the cross resembles more a totem pole, certainly something much more pagan and ancient. The Sculptures are now a popular walk which I took recently. Here are some photos of the pieces that I found interesting and a google map with their location:

John the Baptist By Rodin

The Glenkiln Cross by Henry Moore

The Glenkiln Cross by Henry Moore

The Glenkiln Cross by Moore

The Glenkiln Cross by Moore

Visitation by Jakob Epstein

Visitation by Jakob Epstein

The Sculptures are listed in a couple of books on walks around Dumfries and Galloway and a google search throws up a few results for further reference.

op